Customer Support

Legacy customers can obtain support through using the Ksplice Support page. If you are having difficulties logging in, use can contact us by email or other methods.

Oracle Linux customers who have Oracle Linux Premier Support should use Oracle Support for customer support.

Supported Kernels

Oracle continues to support kernels for various Linux distributions for pre-acquisition customers. Non-Oracle Linux kernels are only supported for grandfathered customers; all other customers must be Oracle Linux Premier Support customers using Oracle Linux.

Oracle Linux

  • All Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel versions for Oracle Linux 7 starting with 3.8.13-35 (released May 13, 2014).
  • All Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel versions for Oracle Linux 5 and 6 starting with 2.6.32-100.28.9 (released March 16, 2011).
  • All Oracle Linux 7 kernels starting with the official release
  • All Oracle Linux 6 kernels starting with the official release
  • All Oracle Linux 5 Red Hat Compatible Kernels starting with Oracle Linux 5.4 (2.6.18-164.el5, released September 9, 2009)
  • All Oracle Linux 5 Red Hat Compatible Kernels with bug fixes added by Oracle starting with Oracle Linux 5.6 (2.6.18-238.0.0.0.1.el5, released January 22, 2011)

Red Hat and CentOS

  • All CentOS and RHEL 7 kernels starting with the official release
  • All CentOS and RHEL 6 kernels starting with the official release
  • All CentOS and RHEL 5 non-Xen kernels starting with 2.6.18-92.1.22.el5 (released Dec. 5, 2008)
  • All CentOS and RHEL 5 Xen kernels starting with 2.6.18-128.1.14.el5xen (released June 1, 2009)
  • All CentOSPlus 5 non-Xen kernels starting with 2.6.18-92.1.22.el5.centos.plus (released Dec. 17, 2008)
  • All CentOSPlus 5 Xen kernels starting with 2.6.18-128.1.14.el5.centos.plusxen (released June 20, 2009)

Virtuozzo and OpenVZ

  • All OpenVZ EL6 kernels starting with the official release
  • All OpenVZ EL5 non-Xen kernels starting with stab059.6 (released Nov. 14, 2008)
  • All OpenVZ EL5 Xen kernels starting with stab064.4 (released Aug. 9, 2009)
  • All Virtuozzo 4.7 "i686", "x86_64", and "ent" kernels starting with the official release
  • All Virtuozzo 4.0 and 4.6 "i686", "x86_64", and "ent" kernels starting with stab057.4 (released Aug. 1, 2008)

Debian

  • All Squeeze "686", "amd64", Xen, and OpenVZ kernels starting with the official release of Squeeze
  • All Squeeze "686" and "amd64" backport kernels starting with the official release of Squeeze backports.
  • All Wheezy "686" and "amd64" kernels starting with the official release of Wheezy
  • All Jessie "686" and "amd64" kernels starting with the official release of Jessie

Ubuntu

  • All 15.04 Vivid kernels starting with the official release
  • All 14.10 Utopic kernels starting with the official release
  • All 14.04 LTS Trusty kernels starting with the official release
  • All 12.04 LTS Precise kernels starting with the official release

Fedora

  • All Fedora 21 kernels starting with the official release
  • All Fedora 20 kernels starting with the official release

CloudLinux

  • All CloudLinux 6 kernels starting with the official release
  • All CloudLinux 5 kernels starting with 2.6.18-264.15.1.el5.lve0.6.20 (released April 4, 2010)

Scientific Linux

  • All Scientific Linux 6 kernels starting with the official release
  • All Scientific Linux 5 kernels starting with 2.6.18-194.11.4.el5 (released Sept. 17, 2010)

Amazon EC2

  • Amazon EC2 supports distribution stock Xen kernels. See http://aws.amazon.com/articles/Amazon-EC2/3967 for details on using stock kernels in EC2.

Rackspace Cloud

  • Rackspace Cloud has experimental support for stock kernels, with detailed instructions at http://cloudservers.rackspacecloud.com/index.php/Using_a_Custom_Kernel_with_pv-grub.

To be compatible with Ksplice, you must use a distribution stock Xen kernel that is supported by Ksplice as your base kernel.

Installing Uptrack

Preparation

Your system must have access to the internet to install Ksplice. If you are using a proxy, set the proxy in your shell:

# export http_proxy=http://proxy.company.com:port
# export https_proxy=http://proxy.company.com:port

You also need your Ksplice access key. This was emailed to you when you signed up for Ksplice. You can also get it from your Ksplice System Status page.

Using the Installer

Please make sure to read the preparation steps above.

The easiest way to install Ksplice is to use our installer script. Replacing YOUR_ACCESS_KEY with your access key:

# wget -N https://www.ksplice.com/uptrack/install-uptrack
# sh install-uptrack YOUR_ACCESS_KEY
# uptrack-upgrade -y

If you'd like Ksplice Uptrack to automatically install updates as they become available, run:

# sh install-uptrack YOUR_ACCESS_KEY --autoinstall

in place of the above install-uptrack command, or set autoinstall = yes in /etc/uptrack/uptrack.conf after installation.

# cat /etc/uptrack/uptrack.conf
...
[Settings]
...
autoinstall = yes
#

If installing on a Debian or Ubuntu machine, you may first need to install the ca-certificates package using:

# apt-get install ca-certificates

Without this package you will see a "certificate verification error".

Installing Manually

You need to enable JavaScript to see the manual installation instructions.

Installing API Tools

If you don't already have Ksplice Uptrack installed on this system:

Follow the manual installation instructions above for your distribtuion through the line where you set up the Ksplice Uptrack repository. That line is rpm -i ksplice-uptrack-release.noarch.rpm for rpm-based systems and apt-key add ksplice-archive.asc for dpkg-based systems.

Install python-ksplice-uptrack using your package manager:

# yum install -y python-ksplice-uptrack

or

# apt-get install python-ksplice-uptrack

Subscription Agreement

Legacy customers can view their Subscription Agreement here.